Pat Hanly

Girl Asleep

1964
ink monoprint and graphite on paper
500mm x 650mm

signed Hanly, dated 64 and inscribed girl asleep and 2/2 in coloured pencil lower left

Provenance

The collection of Gil and Pat Hanly, Auckland.

Essay

The general tendency to associate Pat Hanly (born in Palmerston North, in 1932) primarily with his bright, euphoric palette and expressionistic gestures has obscured the subtly ...

Read full text
Estimate $3,500 - $5,500
Achieved $5,705.94

Pat Hanly

Winters Day 69

1969

ink and watercolour on paper

inscribed Winters day 69 in graphite upper left; signed Hanly and dated 69 in ink lower right

435mm x 592mm

Auction N˚6

Estimate $7,000 - $12,000

Achieved $8,709.06

The Human Condition

by Andrew Paul Wood

The general tendency to associate Pat Hanly (born in Palmerston North, in 1932) primarily with his bright, euphoric palette and expressionistic gestures has obscured the subtly of his drawing and perkiness of his line from broader appreciation. His drawings are well worthy of equal consideration with the paintings, as masterworks in their own right.

It was drawing that first attracted Hanly to art. His grandfather, an amateur artist, encouraged Hanly’s drawing, unlike his teachers at school. With his first wages as an apprentice hairdresser at Bert Pratt Ltd in Palmerston North, the young Pat bought a book of Rembrandt drawings that his protective mother whisked away, lest he be defiled by the nudes. He also took night classes with the British-born landscape painter Allan Leary at the local technical college.

In 1952, Hanly enrolled as a non-Diploma student at the Canterbury College School of Art in Christchurch (forerunner of Canterbury University’s School of Fine Arts), where the traditional training under Bill Sutton and Russell Clark prioritised good drawing technique. There, Hanly made friends with his contemporaries, the printmaker Bill Culbert and the photographer Gil Taverner, the latter of whom he married, in 1958.

On his return from the obligatory European O.E. in 1962, having attended London’s Chelsea School of Art, Hanly supported his painting with a part-time lectureship in drawing at the University of Auckland’s School of Architecture. After nearly a decade away absorbing all that European modernism had to offer, Hanly was determined to reconnect with the Pacific environment. By this time, his skills had reached a high degree of refinement, as is evident from the supple confidence of every contour and form in his drawings.