Bill Hammond

Dog

1980
graphite on paper
317mm x 235mm

signed W Hammond, dated 1980 and inscribed Dog in graphite lower edge

Provenance

Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 1982.

Essay

If a painter should wish to unite a horse’s neck to a human head, and spread a variety of plumage over limbs [of different animals] taken from every part [of nature], so t...

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Estimate $1,000 - $2,000
Achieved $2,282.38

Bill Hammond

There's a brand new dance but I don't know its name

c. 1980–82

ink on paper

signed W Hammond, dated 1982 and inscribed ‘THERES a BRAND NEW DANCE BUT I DONT KNOW iTS NAME’ D. BOWIE in graphite lower edge

235mm x 435mm

Auction N˚6

Estimate $1,000 - $2,000

Achieved $3,243.38

Automatic Impulse

by Andrew Paul Wood

If a painter should wish to unite a horse’s neck to a human head, and spread a variety of plumage over limbs [of different animals] taken from every part [of nature], so that what is a beautiful woman in the upper part terminates unsightly in an ugly fish below; could you, my friends, refrain from laughter, were you admitted to such a sight?
–Horace, Ars Poetica

But does laughter preclude taking something deadly seriously? Lyttelton-based artist Bill Hammond needs very little introduction, given his unassailable position among New Zealand’s blue-chip investment artists. While he is popularly known for his lush, atmospheric canvases populated by melancholic human-bird hybrids, awaiting taxidermic colonisation in their Edenic landscape, this has only been the dominant theme in his work since the 1990s, inspired by a 1989 visit to the to the bird-encrusted Auckland Islands as part of the Art in the Sub-Antarctic project, and an Arts Council funded visit to Japan in 1990 where he was exposed to traditional Japanese art.