Tony de Lautour

Conspiracy Plan

2002
oil on canvas
1210mm x 810mm

signed Tony de Lautour and dated 2002 in brushpoint upper right; inscribed CONSPIRACY PLAN in brushpoint upper left

Provenance

Private collection, Fielding.
Acquired from Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 2002.

Exhibitions

New & Recent Paintings, Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 31st July–17th August, 2002.

LandsCaper, Te Manawa Museum of Art, Science and History, Palmerston North, 20 September–30 November, 2003.

Essay

Tony de Lautour’s career has been characterised by a posture of “bad-ness,” what Jonathan Bywater calls the “bastard culture of commercial internationalism.”¹  Of co...

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Estimate $5,000 - $8,000
Achieved $5,862.50

Tony de Lautour

Conspiracy Plan

2002

oil on canvas

signed Tony de Lautour and dated 2002 in brushpoint upper right; inscribed CONSPIRACY PLAN in brushpoint upper left

1210mm x 810mm

Auction N˚4

Estimate $5,000 - $8,000

Achieved $5,862.50

Footnotes
  1. Jonathan Bywater, “Elvis and Other Evils: The Art of Tony de Lautour,” Art New Zealand 75 (1995): 64.

Conspiracy Plan

by Andrew Clark

Tony de Lautour’s career has been characterised by a posture of “bad-ness,” what Jonathan Bywater calls the “bastard culture of commercial internationalism.”¹  Of course, if you call your first show Bad White Art, this kind of thing is bound to happen; de Lautour has hardly shied away from such an identity. Even his recent shift into abstraction seems in some sense to be a reaction to the suspicion levelled at abstract painting in recent years; if abstraction has devolved to the status of “zombie formalism” in the eyes of the critical establishment, then by de Lautour’s logic, it might finally be “bad” enough for him to engage with. Over the years, de Lautour’s oeuvre has catalogued a range of icons of “badness,” in several senses of the word: bug-eyed, strung-out figures, bottles of booze, snakes, spiders, joints, hypodermics, knives, guns.