Peter Peryer

The Wind at Whenuapai

1998
gelatin silver print, edition of 10
103mm x 148mm

signed Peter Peryer, dated 1998 and inscribed The Wind at Whenuapai in graphite verso; inscribed Peter Peryer, The Wind at Whenuapai, 1998, signed at Mt Pleasant Rd, 14 July 99 in another hand verso

Provenance

Acquired from Webb’s, Auckland, 25 September, 2013, lot 40.

Exhibitions

Another from the edition included in Peter Peryer – A Careful Eye, The Dowse Art Museum, 23 Aug–23 Nov 2014.

Literature

Peryer, Peter and Peter Simpson. Peter Peryer: Photographer. Auckland: Auckland University Press, 2008.

Essay

Located on the end of the runway at Whenuapai Airbase, the windsock pictured here tells the pilots of incoming planes what wind speed and direction they can expect on approach. ...

Read full text
Estimate $1,500 - $2,500
Achieved $1,035

Peter Peryer

The Wind at Whenuapai

1998

gelatin silver print, edition of 10

signed Peter Peryer, dated 1998 and inscribed The Wind at Whenuapai in graphite verso; inscribed Peter Peryer, The Wind at Whenuapai, 1998, signed at Mt Pleasant Rd, 14 July 99 in another hand verso

103mm x 148mm

Auction N˚1

Estimate $1,500 - $2,500

Achieved $1,035

Footnotes
  1. A Talk with Peter Peryer at Hamish McKay Gallery, 2010,https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8g06ycCiqIM
  2. What is your intention?, 2008, http://peryer.blogspot.co.uk/2008/10/what-is-your-intention-today-i-want-to.html
  3. 1998 was also a pivotal year for the artist, in that from this year onward he began to use digital photography and also displayed a growing interest in producing colour images.
  4. Windsock at Te Anau, 2007, peryer.blogspot.co.uk/2007/10/windsock-at-te-anau-heres-photo-thats.html

The Wind at Whenuapai

by Dan Munn

Located on the end of the runway at Whenuapai Airbase, the windsock pictured here tells the pilots of incoming planes what wind speed and direction they can expect on approach. These instruments are manufactured and calibrated so as to have a certain amount of ‘hang’ until the wind reaches a specific speed, usually 15 knots, at which point they blow arrow-straight.

Peter Peryer has stated that he doesn’t “get up in the morning and think ‘I’m going to take a photograph on a particular theme,’”¹ and has even suggested that the practice of encouraging students to write artistic statements might “interfere with the welling up of an artwork in one’s consciousness.”² Instead, he sees his work as being nourished by a wide range of interests, reflected in the artist’s other images from 1998, which include carved tiki bookends (Tahi Rua), a buddhist statue (The Buddha at Kaukapakapa) and historic European facades (Fachwerk, Germany)

At the time when this photograph was taken, Peryer lived just off the end of the airbase on Herald Island, and became familiar with many of the planes that flew past his house. Going so far as to learn their dates of commission, model numbers and specifications, he described them as “a constant source of pleasure.” Several have made their way into his images over the years including the 1998 work Hercules over Herald Island.

The following is an excerpt from an account by the artist in The Left Hand Raised: Peter Peryer, 2001 (Courtesy the artist and Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth).

“Every day I look at this windsock and marvel at what they do and how they work. I particularly wanted to photograph it on a very windy day. On this particular occasion, the weather was right but I was struck down by a bad flu. I struggled out of bed, put on my dressing gown over my pyjamas, and drove off. I was able to take this photograph just by shooting through the open driver’s window, without getting out of the car. Ten minutes later I was back in bed. I am now keen to take another version of this image, this time with no wind at all.”